Quick Info

Name:
Israel

More about Israel

Capital: Jerusalem
Language: Hebrew and Arabic
Currency: Israeli New Shekel (ILS)
Time zone: UTC +2

Despite its small size, Israel boasts an unbeatable amount of things to do that will delight every traveler’s senses. From religious sites and archaeological wonders to lively cities packed with history and nightlife and breathtaking natural landscapes that will leave even the pickiest of visitors awestruck.

Israel has the highest number of museums per capita in the world. Moreover, Tel Aviv was ranked as the top ten city for nightlife and described as the “capital of Mediterranean cool” by Lonely Planet. This tiny country is the Holy Place of Jews, Muslims and Christians and many biblical places concentrate here. Float in the Dead Sea, get lost in infinite deserts, discover Jerusalem, enjoy Tel Aviv – Israel has something to offer to anyone’s tastes.

Climate
The northern part of Israel has a Mediterranean climate (hot, dry summers and cool, rainy winters). The south and east have an arid climate.

The rainy season starts in October and lasts until the beginning of May, with the northern parts of the country receiving noticeably more rain than the south.

Culture
Israel is considered part of the Holy Land of Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Bahaism, who all have significant ties here. Tiny in size, Israel contains a vibrant history and mixture of cultures and personalities. Even though it was officially founded in 1948, the country’s history goes back to the beginning of human civilizations.

Israel boasts a mix of culture like no other, with a complex history to back it up and hence, it is a destination that has fascinated travellers and pilgrims for centuries on end.

Gastronomy
Israeli cuisine adapts many styles of Jewish gastronomy, namely Mizrahi, Sephardic and Ashkenzi cooking, brought by Jews from the Diaspora. Middle Eastern foods such as falafel, couscous, hummus and more are also popular in the country. Another great influencer has been the Mediterranean region, as many items common to the area are available in Israel and commonly incorporated into every-day dishes.

Kosher foods are also a big part of the Israeli cuisine. Kosher incorporates all food that conforms to the Jewish dietary law known as kashrut. For example, laws that form the kashrut prohibit the consumption of pork and shellfish.